Psalm 84, vs. 1-4

“Yea, the sparrow hath found an house, and the swallow a nest for herself, where she may lay her young, even then altars, O Lord of hosts, my King, and my God.”

Psalm 84, vs. 1-4, recorded by the David/Asaph Project. Originally released in 2014 on the Pastoral Psalms album, was revised & remastered in 2016. Duration is 2:03.

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Details

Produced by John Piper

Musical composition by David Albracht

Recorded in the Dallas area and Louisiana
Engineered & Mixed by John Piper
Mastered by Pete Maher

Musicians:
Bass – Lou Harlas
Cello – Pearce Meisenbach
Dobro, Violin – Milo Deering
Guitar – John Piper
Percussion – John Bryant
Piano – Ken Boome
Vocals – David Albracht

Image above: Swallows Bird’s Nest

Description

Psalm 84, vs. 1-4,  the first track of the Pastoral Psalms album, was recorded by the David/Asaph Project during the years 2007-2013. This song features the text of the KJV translation set to new music with all acoustic instrumentation. Song duration is 2:03. This song is the first of three movements for the entire 84th Psalm, spanning the first 4 verses.

 

C.H. Spurgeon's Comments on the text of Psalm 84


To the Chief Musician upon Gittith
. A Psalm for the sons of Korah. This Psalm well deserved to be committed to the noblest of the sons of song. No music could be too sweet for its theme, or too exquisite in sound to match the beauty of its language. Sweeter than the joy of the wine press, (for that is said to be the meaning of the word rendered upon Gittith), is the joy of the holy assemblies of the Lord’s house; not even the favoured children of grace, who are like the sons of Korah, can have a richer subject for song than Zion’s sacred festivals.

It matters little when this Psalm was written, or by whom; for our part it exhales to us a Davidic perfume, it smells of the mountain heather and the lone places of the wilderness, where King David must have often lodged during his many wars. This sacred ode is one of the choicest of the collection; it has a mild radiance about it, entitling it to be called The Pearl of Psalms. If the twenty-third be the most popular, the one-hundred- and-third the most joyful, the one-hundred-and-nineteenth the most deeply experimental, the fifty-first the most plaintive, this is one of the most sweet of the Psalms of peace.

The Treasury of David