Psalm 5, vs. 1-4

“Give ear to my words, O Lord, consider my meditation. Hearken unto the voice of my cry, my King, and my God: for unto thee will I pray. My voice shalt thou hear in the morning, O Lord; in the morning will I direct my prayer unto thee, and will look up.”

Psalm 5, vs. 1-4, recorded by the David/Asaph Project. Originally released in 2014 on the Pastoral Psalms album, was revised & remastered in 2016. Duration is 1:43.

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Details

Produced by John Piper

Musical composition by David Albracht

Recorded in the Dallas, Texas area
Engineered & Mixed by John Piper
Mastered by Pete Maher

Musicians:
Bass – Lou Harlas
Dobro, Mandolin – Milo Deering
Percussion – Mike Drake
Piano – Ken Boome
Vocals – David Albracht

Image above – copyright: zavulonya / 123RF Stock Photo

Description

Psalm 5, vs. 1-4, the tenth track of the Pastoral Psalms album, was recorded by the David/Asaph Project during the years 2007-2013. This song features the text of the KJV translation set to new music with all acoustic instrumentation. Song duration is 1:43. This song is the first of three movements for the entire 5th Psalm, spanning the first 4 verses.

The second shortest song of the album, Psalm 5, vs. 1-4, opens with piano and acoustic bass, and is then joined by the mandolin of Milo Deering.

C.H. Spurgeon's Comments on the text of Psalm 5

 

“To the Chief Musician upon Nehiloth, a Psalm of David.” The Hebrew word Nehiloth is taken from another word, signifying “to perforate;” “to bore through,” whence it comes to mean a pipe or a flute; so that this song was probably intended to be sung with an accompaniment of wind instruments, such as the horn, the trumpet, flute, or cornet. However, it is proper to remark that we are not sure of the interpretation of these ancient titles, for the Septuagint translates it, “For him who shall obtain inheritance,” and Aben Ezra thinks it denotes some old and well known melody to which this Psalm was to be played. The best scholars confess that great darkness hangs over the precise interpretation of the title; nor is this much to be regretted, for it furnishes an internal evidence of the great antiquity of the Book. Throughout the first, second, third, and forth Psalms, you will have noticed that the subject is a contrast between the position, the character, and the prospects of the righteous and of the wicked. In this Psalm you will note the same. The Psalmist carries out a contrast between himself made righteous by God’s grace, and the wicked who opposed him. To the devout mind there is here presented a precious view of the Lord Jesus, of whom it is said that in the days of his flesh, he offered up prayers and supplications with strong crying and tears.

The Treasury of David