Psalm 5, vs. 5-8

” But as for me, I will come into thy house in the multitude of thy mercy: and in thy fear will I worship toward thy holy temple.”

Psalm 5, vs. 5-8, recorded by the David/Asaph Project. Originally released in 2014 on the Pastoral Psalms album, was revised & remastered in 2016. Duration is 2:00.

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Details

Produced by John Piper

Musical composition by David Albracht

Recorded in the Dallas, Texas area
Engineered & Mixed by John Piper
Mastered by Pete Maher

Musicians:
Bass – Lou Harlas
Dobro, Mandolin – Milo Deering
Percussion – Mike Drake
Piano – Ken Boome
Vocals – David Albracht

Image above: Van Honthorst, Gerard. Kind David Playing the Harp. 1622. Painting. Centraal Museum in Utrecht.

Description

Psalm 5, vs. 5-8, the eleventh track of the Pastoral Psalms album, was recorded by the David/Asaph Project during the years 2007-2013. This song features the text of the KJV translation set to new music with all acoustic instrumentation. Song duration is 2:00. This song is the second of three movements for the entire 5th Psalm, spanning the middle verses 5-8.

Another brief song of the three movements, Psalm 5, vs. 5-8, continues with piano, bass, and mandolin. A quiet shaker is added, followed by Dobro.

C.H. Spurgeon's Comments regarding the text of verses 7 & 8

 

Verse 7. With this verse the first part of the Psalm ends. The Psalmist has bent his knee in prayer; he has described before God, as an argument for his deliverance, the character and the fate of the wicked; and now he contrasts this with the condition of the righteous. “But as for me, I will come into thy house.” I will not stand at a distance, I will come into thy sanctuary, just as a child comes into his father’s house. But I will not come there by my own merits; no, I have a multitude of sins, and therefore I will come in the multitude of thy mercy. I will approach thee with confidence because of thy immeasurable grace. God’s judgments are all numbered, but his mercies are innumerable; he gives his wrath by weight, but without weight his mercy. “And in thy fear will I worship toward thy holy temple,”—towards the temple of thy holiness. The temple was not built on earth at that time; it was but a tabernacle; but David was wont to turn his eyes spiritually to that temple of God’s holiness where between the wings of the Cherubim Jehovah dwells in light ineffable. Daniel opened his window toward Jerusalem, but we open our hearts toward heaven.

Verse 8. Now we come to the second part, in which the Psalmist repeats his arguments, and goes over the same ground again. “Lead me, O Lord,” as a little child is led by its father, as a blind man is guided by his friend. It is safe and pleasant walking when God leads the way. “In thy righteousness,” not in my righteousness, for that is imperfect, but in thine, for thou art righteousness itself. “Make thy way,” not my way, “straight before my face.” Brethren, when we have learned to give up our own way, and long to walk in God’s way, it is a happy sign of grace; and it is no small mercy to see the way of God with clear vision straight before our face. Errors about duty may lead us into a sea of sins, before we know where we are.

The Treasury of David